Custom Products

Sheriff & Deputy Badges

A Sheriff Badge That Makes History

Let’s face it, a sheriff has to wear a lot of hats, well generally only one but you know what we mean.  He protects peace, enforces law, provides traffic control, investigates accidents, transports prisoners and not to mention leads community associations.  With all the different hats to wear, there should be one constant to recognize the sheriff and that is a sheriff badge.  SymbolArts prides itself in our rich history in providing custom sheriff badges to sheriff’s and deputies across the nation.  When it comes to a deputy sheriff badge, we are the experts with all shapes and designs.  Typical sheriff badges and deputy sheriff badges are the 5, 6 and 7 point star and the 5,6 and 7 point circle star badge.  Though they may be typical sheriff badge shapes, SymbolArts’ custom sheriff badges not only will incorporate your county’s tradition but will be a county landmark.

When looking for sheriff badges for sale, look no further.  A SymbolArts badge always has the “jewelry quality” stamp to re-assure that our badge can be worn as a piece of jewelry.  There is no shine like a SymbolArts’ deputy sheriff badge shine.  We put enough coats until you can see your reflection unless of course, you ask for no reflections.  Call us today to start your sheriff badge or deputy sheriff badge and make county history.

Police Badges Sheriff Badges Fire Badges
Anniversary Badges Security Badges Military Badges
State Park Badges

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Did You Know

History of Dog Tags

During the Civil War, soldiers used various methods of tagging themselves for purposes of identification in the event of death on the battle field.  Many wrote their names on paper tags and pinned them to their clothing.  Some made tags out of wood with carved holes at the end to be worn as a necklace.  Coins were also smoothed over and engraved with their name and unit number.

Metal military dog tags originated during World War I. Tags manufactured between 1941 and the early 1970’s had a notch in one end.  It is a myth that the notch was used to wedge between the teeth of fallen soldiers.  The notch was actually needed to keep the tag in place on the machine that was used to stamp the military personel’s surname (follwed by initials), service number, branch of service, blood type and religion (if desired by the individual).  The process for stamping the tags has changed, and the notch is no longer needed.